Cancer-Related Fatigue – Fighting Those Zzzzzs

Triage Cancer FatigueHas your treatment left you feeling unusually tired? If yes, you be experiencing cancer-related fatigue.

What is cancer-related fatigue?

Cancer-related fatigue is a persistent feeling of physical, emotional, or mental tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer and/or its treatment. Some of the symptoms include:

  • Feeling tired and it not getting better, it constantly returning, or it becoming severe
  • Being more tired than usual during or after an activity
  • Feeling tired with no relation to any activity
  • Putting less effort into your appearance because you’re too tired
  • Being too tired to do the things you normally do
  • Having no energy and/or feeling weak
  • Feeling tired even with sufficient rest and sleep
  • Spending more time in bed and/or sleeping more
  • Staying in bed for more than 24 hours
  • Not being able to concentrate or focus your thoughts
  • Having trouble remembering things
  • Becoming confused
  • Feeling tired and it disrupting your work, social life, or daily routine
  • Feeling sad, depressed, or irritable
  • Feeling frustrated, irritable, and upset about the fatigue and its effects on your life

What causes cancer-related fatigue?

There are several factors that can contribute to cancer-related fatigue. Some of the causes include:

  • Cancer treatment
  • Anemia
  • High/low hormone levels
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration
  • Lack of exercise
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

 How is cancer-related fatigue treated?

The first step in treating fatigue is to identify the cause. If the cause is not known, you may need to try several different methods in order to figure out which one works for you. Staying physically active can help both manage fatigue and improve strength. Over time, try to build up to 150 minutes of moderate activity (walking, cycling, swimming) per week. You can also add in strength training exercises. Make sure that you are staying hydrated, by drinking enough water.

A psychosocial care professional (e.g., therapist, counselor, social workers, psychologist, psychiatrist, etc.) can help provide you with emotional support, which may alleviate your fatigue. Many patients have also found that acupuncture and yoga can help. Cancer-related fatigue can persist months or years after treatment, so it’s important to receive both short-term and long-term care.

Although common among cancer patients, cancer-related fatigue is not something that should be taken lightly. It is important that you talk with your doctor, or other members of your health care team, if your fatigue is affecting your health and well-being.

For more information on cancer-related fatigue, click here.