Six Key Things You Need to Know During Open Enrollment

Open enrollment for plans sold in the Marketplaces started yesterday and we have Six Key Things to Know Open Enrollmentbeen hearing that there is still a lot of confusion. As a reminder, open enrollment is the time of year consumers can shop for a new plan or make changes to existing plans. For Marketplace and Medicare plans the plan won’t start until January 1, 2018. Employer plans may have different start dates, so check with your employer. Here are six key things you need to know during open enrollment:

  1. Health insurance can be confusing.
    1. Make sure you understand the key terms used in your health insurance policy. Watch our new video – Triage Cancer Presents: Health Insurance Basics to learn more. This information is useful regardless of where you get your health insurance coverage.
  2. Financial assistance still exists for most people who purchase plans in the marketplace.
    1. For 2018, 8 in 10 people have Marketplace health insurance options for $75 or less, a month. This is mostly due to the premium tax credits available to people based on their income level.
    2. Even though the Administration has said that they will no longer pay the insurance companies back for providing cost-sharing subsidies (aka cost-sharing reductions), the insurance companies still have to provide those discounts to consumers.
  3. Individuals shopping for insurance (regardless of where they get it – Medicare, employers, private companies), should be sure to do the math when comparing options!
    1. Often times we only look at the monthly premium of a plan. However, to accurately determine what a plan with cost you for the year, you have to do the math! Assuming that a consumer will reach their out-of-pocket maximum during the year, the way to do the math is to multiply the monthly premium by 12, then add that amount to the plan’s out-of-pocket maximum. You may be surprised to find that the bronze plan may not be your most affordable option.
    2. Consumers should also look at the network of doctors and hospitals, the other costs (e.g., co-payments, deductibles, etc.), and prescription drug coverage.
    3. For more information on how to pick a plan watch our webinar, Choosing Wisely: How to Pick an Insurance Plan or visit CancerFinances.org.
  4. Individuals who are eligible for Medicare are not eligible to purchase plans in the Marketplace. Visit http://medicare.gov for more information about plan options.
  5. Be wary of short-term health insurance plans.
    1. These plans may look attractive based on their low cost, but they are not considered creditable coverage and when they end, consumers typically aren’t eligible for a special enrollment period to buy a plan in the Marketplaces, which could leave them with a gap in coverage. Additionally, they do not have to include the consumer protections in the ACA and may be able to charge people with cancer more, or exclude covering cancer treatments.
  6. Open enrollment dates may vary depending on where you live.
    1. The federally run Marketplace will be open from November 1 – December 15; however, some states have extended their open enrollment periods.
    2. There are also some extensions available for people who were affected by the recent hurricanes. (see the link above)

Clarifying Open Enrollment

There has been a lot of confusion about open enrollment for health insurance coverage in the news and on social media and we want to clarify some things and share some news:

  1. Open enrollment to buy coverage for 2018 through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces has been cut from 12 weeks to just 6 weeks, running from November 1 to December 31. However, there are some additional things you need to know:
    1. If you live in one of the states below, your state may have decided to keep open enrollment open longer:
      • California – November 1 to January 31
      • Colorado – November 1 to January 12
      • D.C. – November 1 to January 31
      • Massachusetts – November 1 to January 31
      • Minnesota – November 1 to January 14
      • Washington – November 1 to January 1
    2. If you were affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, or Maria, you also have access special enrollment periods, which extends the time you have to get coverage in 2017 or enroll in coverage for 2018.
      • Group A:
        • Timing: The date of the SEP qualifying event through December 31, 2017.
        • Eligibility: Individuals who experienced an SEP qualifying event between 60 days prior to the start date of the incident period and December 31, 2017 and reside, or resided at the time of the hurricane, in any of the counties declared as meeting the level of “individual assistance” or “public assistance” by FEMA.
        • What to do: Contact the Marketplace Call Center at 1-800-318-2596.
      • Group B:
        • Timing: December 16, 2017 through December 31, 2017.
        • Eligibility: Individuals who reside in or move from areas affected by a hurricane in 2017, who are applying for 2018 coverage.
        • What to do: Contact the Marketplace Call Center at 1-800-318-2596 to request an enrollment after December 15, 2017.
  1. Medicare open enrollment occurs each year for people to enroll or switch Medicare plans and prescription drug plans. Medicare open enrollment runs from October 15 to December 7, but the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have announced a special enrollment period to give people more time to enroll due to the recent hurricanes.
    1. Timing: From the start of the incident period through December 31, 2017.
    2. Eligibility: Individuals who reside, or resided at the start of the incident period, in an area for which the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has declared an emergency or a major disaster; individuals who do not live in the affected areas but rely on friends or family members who live in the affected areas for help making health care decisions.
    3. What to do: Contact 1-800-MEDICARE to access the special enrollment period. Click here for more information.

Remember, with both Medicare and Marketplace plans, when you sign up for coverage in open enrollment, you coverage won’t actually start before January 1, 2018.

If you need coverage now, visit CancerFinances.org or watch our webinar recording on how to pick a health insurance plan, to see if you have other options.

Health Care in the News: Keeping Down Costs

  1. Cost-Sharing Reductions: On Thursday, 10/12, the President announced the discontinuation of cost-sharing reduction payments (CSRs) for health insurers that sell plans in the state Health Insurance Marketplaces.
    • For those who choose to buy health insurance coverage through the marketplaces, they may be eligible for 2 types of financial assistance: 1) premium tax credits; and 2) cost-sharing reductions. Premium tax credits reduce your monthly premium payment for whichever plan you choose to buy in the marketplace. Cost-sharing reductions are a requirement in the ACA, that insurance companies lower the cost of deductibles, co-payments, and co-insurance amounts on silver level plans, based on your income level. The cost-sharing reductions are provided by the insurance company, but are reimbursed by the federal government.
    • Since taking office, the President has indicated that he might end the CSRs. His lack of a definitive decision creative uncertainty for insurance companies in determining their rates for plans sold in the marketplace for 2018. This uncertainty actually cause may insurers across the country to choose not to sell plans in the marketplace for 2018, which ultimately reduces competition and increases rates for the plans that are sold in the marketplace. Some companies decided to continue to sell their plans, but increased their rates, to cover the loss of the CSR payments from the federal government.
    • It now falls on Congress to fund the CSR payments for 2018 and beyond. There is currently a proposal being discussed in the Senate to fund the CSR payments for two years, but it includes other changes (see below).
    • On Wednesday, 10/18, eighteen states filed a temporary restraining order to force the President to continue funding the CSR payments.

Alexander-Murray-Keeping-Costs-Down

  1. Alexander-Murray Legislation: On Wednesday, 10/18, in response to the President’s decision to end the CSR payments, U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Patty Murray (D-WA) reached a bipartisan compromise that is an important first step to stabilize health insurance markets and provide states more flexibility, while maintaining important patient protections.
    • They have proposed bi-partisan legislation, which will likely keep health insurance costs lower for consumers. This legislation is supported by nearly 30 cancer organizations representing patients, physicians, nurses, and social workers, because cancer patients and survivors need access to quality, affordable health insurance. However, there are some political compromises included in this bill.
    • This bill funds the CSR payments through 2019 and restores some of the funding that was previously cut by the President, for outreach and education about open enrollment and health insurance options.
    • This bill also takes some steps to expand access to catastrophic health insurance plans, which could allow more people to afford health insurance, but there is also serious concern about the limited coverage included in these plans. It also allows states flexibility to waive some of the ACA requirements for plans sold through the marketplace. Again, while it may expand access, there are some questions about the coverage included in those plans.
    • At this time, it is unclear if there are enough votes to pass this legislation. If you would like to share your opinion or experience, you can contact your U.S. Senators by calling: 844-257-6227.
  1. Executive Order: On Thursday, 10/12, the President also signed an Executive Order, which allows insurance companies to sell policies across state lines and to sell cheaper policies with less coverage than currently required under the ACA. The challenge with this proposal is that:
    • It allows insurance companies to avoid state health consumer protections.
    • It also creates a situation where people can buy minimal health insurance coverage, but if they are diagnosed with a serious medical condition like cancer, then they find out that those policies don’t cover needed medical care, like chemotherapy.
    • The Executive Order requires federal agencies to draft regulations, share the draft for public comments, and then release final regulations on these changes.

As these events unfold, Triage Cancer will continue to provide updates on these changes and how they may have an impact on the cancer community. Stay tuned.

Graham-Cassidy Fails, But Health Care Protections Still at Risk

Last week a new version of an ACA ‘Repeal and Replace’ bill was unveiled in the U.S. Senate. This legislation has been dubbed “Graham-Cassidy” after the two main authors of the bill, Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.). In order for the bill to be passed under a process called Budget Reconciliation, the vote must occur before September 30, 2017.  The reason that Republicans are trying to advance the legislation through the reconciliation process is that debate time is limited, it cannot be blocked by a filibuster, and therefore, the legislation only needs 50 votes to pass. There are currently 52 Republican Senators. The Congressional Budget Office has only released a preliminary review of the potential impact of the bill, and found that millions of people would lose health insurance coverage under this bill.

Unfortunately, like previous proposals this bill would also take away consumer protections and ultimately leave people with pre-existing conditions unprotected. (read more about earlier proposals).

Triage Cancer is proud to stand with patient advocacy groups from across the country in opposition to the Graham-Cassidy bill.

Graham-Cassidy Fails

Also, in case you missed it, Triage Cancer’s CEO, Joanna Morales wrote an open letter to Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski explaining why we at Triage Cancer, a non-partisan organization, are so concerned about any effort to limit access to health care coverage. Her letter was featured in the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship’s blog.

In light of the fact that Senators John McCain (R-AZ), Rand Paul (R-KY) and Susan Collins (R-ME) have publicly stated that they would not support the Graham-Cassidy bill, Senate leadership has decided not to bring the bill for a vote this week. Today, President Trump announced that he now has the votes to pass the bill and will bring it up again during the next reconciliation period. That time period is unknown because the Senate would have to pass a new budget resolution that established a new reconciliation period.

While the ACA is still law of the land, there are still some challenges with respect to access to health care:

  1. Insurers still face uncertainty over the status of the subsidy payments
  2. The 2018 open enrollment period has been significantly cut to a total of six weeks (November 1 – December 15, 2017). But, note that some states have chosen longer enrollment periods:
  • California – November 1 to January 31
  • Colorado – November 1 to January 12
  • D.C. – November 1 to January 31
  • Massachusetts – November 1 to January 31
  • Minnesota – November 1 to January 14
  • Washington – November 1 to January 1
  1. The Administration has cut funding for marketing and in-person assistors to help people enroll in coverage by 90%
  2. The Administration is impeding states’ ability to stabilize their health insurance marketplaces

Stay tuned for updates and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for late breaking news.

California, Other States To Extend Obamacare Sign-Up Beyond Federal Limit


California and several other states will exempt themselves this year from a new Trump administration rule that cuts in half the amount of time consumers have to buy individual 2018-enrollment_1170health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

In California, lawmakers are contemplating legislation that would circumvent the rule in future years, too.

The Trump administration’s rule gives people shopping for 2018 coverage on the federal exchange 45 days to sign up, from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15.

But in California and some of the other states that run their own exchanges — Colorado, Minnesota, Washington and Massachusetts, as well as the District of Columbia — consumers purchasing insurance for themselves this year will have extra time to make decisions.

In Colorado, for example, the sign-up period is from Nov. 1 to Jan. 12. In Minnesota, it will start Nov. 1 and run through Jan. 14. In Washington state, it is Nov. 1 through Jan. 15.

Consumers shopping for coverage in California’s exchange, Covered California, will still have the full three months they’ve had in recent years, starting on Nov. 1 and ending Jan. 31. Californians shopping for individual market plans outside the exchange will have those same three months to make up their minds.

“We want to make sure our consumers have the time they need to find the best plan that fits their needs,” said James Scullary, a spokesman for Covered California.

The rule that truncated the enrollment period for the federal exchange, published in April by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), gives state-based exchanges the ability to extend the amount of time allowed by tacking a “special” enrollment period onto the 45 days set by the federal government.

California and several other states will exempt themselves this year from a new Trump administration rule that cuts in half the amount of time consumers have to buy individual health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

In California, lawmakers are contemplating legislation that would circumvent the rule in future years, too.

The Trump administration’s rule gives people shopping for 2018 coverage on the federal exchange 45 days to sign up, from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15.

But in California and some of the other states that run their own exchanges — Colorado, Minnesota, Washington and Massachusetts, as well as the District of Columbia — consumers purchasing insurance for themselves this year will have extra time to make decisions.

In Colorado, for example, the sign-up period is from Nov. 1 to Jan. 12. In Minnesota, it will start Nov. 1 and run through Jan. 14. In Washington state, it is Nov. 1 through Jan. 15.

Consumers shopping for coverage in California’s exchange, Covered California, will still have the full three months they’ve had in recent years, starting on Nov. 1 and ending Jan. 31. Californians shopping for individual market plans outside the exchange will have those same three months to make up their minds.

“We want to make sure our consumers have the time they need to find the best plan that fits their needs,” said James Scullary, a spokesman for Covered California.

The rule that truncated the enrollment period for the federal exchange, published in April by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), gives state-based exchanges the ability to extend the amount of time allowed by tacking a “special” enrollment period onto the 45 days set by the federal government.

Because that flexibility is limited to 2018 coverage, California legislators are taking an extra step to keep the three-month enrollment period for 2019 and beyond. Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg) introduced legislation last week that would ensure a three-month enrollment window for consumers seeking coverage in 2019 and subsequent years.

“When the Trump administration issued its new … rules cutting the ACA’s open enrollment period in half, we knew we had to act,” Wood said. “Californians have enjoyed a three-month enrollment period for years, and this change could catch people off guard and not allow them to sign up in time. That would be a travesty.”

Health policy experts say the federal rule is a political attempt to undermine the viability of the Obamacare insurance exchanges.

“It’s no big secret that the Trump administration isn’t a big fan of the Affordable Care Act or the individual market that it created,” said Dylan Roby, associate professor of Health Services Administration at the University of Maryland. “There’s just this general intent of the administration to reduce enrollment, reduce … subsidies and make it a little bit harder for people to enroll.”

The shortened enrollment window was part of a so-called market stabilization rule rolled out by the Trump administration that also offers insurance companies concessions, including the flexibility to sell some health plans that cover less of the enrollees’ cost of care than currently required by the ACA.

California’s insurance commissioner, Dave Jones, expressed concern about the impact of a shortened enrollment period in a letter to the federal government in March, before the rule was finalized.

Jones’ letter cited research that shows younger people tend to sign up for health insurance toward the end of open enrollment, and that putting up barriers to their enrollment could reduce the number of healthy people in the insurance pool.

That would “needlessly destabilize the market” and would “result in increased premiums for those who do enroll in coverage,” the insurance commissioner said.

Shana Alex Charles, an assistant professor of health sciences at California State University-Fullerton, said the pushback by California lawmakers against federal attempts to shorten the enrollment period underscores the state’s commitment to having a marketplace that “actually makes sense.”

“If you want to maximize enrollment, you need to make sure people can get their paperwork together, and have the mindset and the time for people to complete the application,” she said.

Because that flexibility is limited to 2018 coverage, California legislators are taking an extra step to keep the three-month enrollment period for 2019 and beyond. Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg) introduced legislation last week that would ensure a three-month enrollment window for consumers seeking coverage in 2019 and subsequent years.

“When the Trump administration issued its new … rules cutting the ACA’s open enrollment period in half, we knew we had to act,” Wood said. “Californians have enjoyed a three-month enrollment period for years, and this change could catch people off guard and not allow them to sign up in time. That would be a travesty.”

Health policy experts say the federal rule is a political attempt to undermine the viability of the Obamacare insurance exchanges.

“It’s no big secret that the Trump administration isn’t a big fan of the Affordable Care Act or the individual market that it created,” said Dylan Roby, associate professor of Health Services Administration at the University of Maryland. “There’s just this general intent of the administration to reduce enrollment, reduce … subsidies and make it a little bit harder for people to enroll.”

The shortened enrollment window was part of a so-called market stabilization rule rolled out by the Trump administration that also offers insurance companies concessions, including the flexibility to sell some health plans that cover less of the enrollees’ cost of care than currently required by the ACA.

California’s insurance commissioner, Dave Jones, expressed concern about the impact of a shortened enrollment period in a letter to the federal government in March, before the rule was finalized.

Jones’ letter cited research that shows younger people tend to sign up for health insurance toward the end of open enrollment, and that putting up barriers to their enrollment could reduce the number of healthy people in the insurance pool.

That would “needlessly destabilize the market” and would “result in increased premiums for those who do enroll in coverage,” the insurance commissioner said.

Shana Alex Charles, an assistant professor of health sciences at California State University-Fullerton, said the pushback by California lawmakers against federal attempts to shorten the enrollment period underscores the state’s commitment to having a marketplace that “actually makes sense.”

“If you want to maximize enrollment, you need to make sure people can get their paperwork together, and have the mindset and the time for people to complete the application,” she said.

This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Tackling Health Care in September

Congress is back in session this week, which means they will likely be tackling health care issues. September will bring more proposed and actual changes to our health care system:

  • Last week, a group of eight governors released a market stabilization plan, which asks Congress to fund the cost-sharing reductions through 2018, improves risk pools, and makes other suggestions to increase competition among insurance companies selling plans in the marketplaces.
  • This week, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions Committee (HELP) is scheduled to hold two hearings on how to stabilize the premiums of individual plans sold through the state health insurance marketplaces. These hearings will include state governors and state insurance commissioners.
  • A group of Republican Senators have proposed an amendment to the larger ACA repeal and replace proposals that were not previously passed by the Senate. Senators Graham, Cassidy, and Heller have proposed block granting to states the money allocated for the ACA financial assistance programs and Medicaid expansion, as well as place a per capita cap on the traditional Medicaid program. Click here to read the amendments.
  • The Trump Administration announced that they would cut the advertising budget by 90%, which promotes the availability of health insurance through the state health insurance marketplaces. They are also cutting the grants to local organizations that work in communities to help people enroll in health insurance coverage.
  • The Administration had already announced a six-week shorter open enrollment period, from November 1, to December 15, for coverage that begins on January 1, 2018.

If you or someone you know needs information about their health insurance options, visit www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay tuned for updates from Triage Cancer, as we learn more about these changes and how they might impact the cancer community.

A Snapshot of the Impact of Proposed Health Care Changes

Health care is a daily news topic. With Republican Members of Congress and the Health Care ChangesPresident working to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many aspects of health care have been brought into question recently, for example, what constitutes as a pre-existing condition, increased coverage for veterans, and who is covered by Medicaid, among others. Today we will provide a snapshot of the impact of the proposed health care changes.

Pre-Existing Conditions

A pre-existing condition is considered a medical condition that started before a person’s health insurance coverage began. Before 2014, when the ACA’s pre-existing condition consumer protections went into effect, some insurance companies would not only deny coverage to people with pre-existing conditions, but even if you were able to get a policy, that policy might not cover your pre-existing condition for a specific period of time, or at all.

The various Republican plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have not done enough to retain protections for people with pre-existing conditions, which could increase health care costs and potentially limit coverage for an estimated 130 million Americans. And this is a very low estimate, when you consider that an insurance company can designate anything from acne, to allergies, to high blood pressure, to obesity, as a pre-existing medical condition.  If you think that broadly, most people in the U.S. have some sort of pre-existing condition.

Coverage for Veterans

Under the Affordable Care Act, coverage for veterans has improved greatly. According to the Urban Institute, the expansion of Medicaid to adults with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL) in more than half the states and the establishment of health insurance marketplaces with income-based financial assistance subsidies, expanded the health insurance options available to veterans.” In just the first two years after these ACA coverage options become available, the uninsured rate of nonelderly veterans dropped about 40%.

If these veterans lose these ACA options for coverage, Time.com writes, “This would likely leave the thousands who do not qualify for VA care without coverage at all, as insurance becomes unaffordable without the ACA’s subsidies. Hundreds of thousands of spouses and children could also lose coverage.”

Who is Covered By Medicaid

The latest Congressional proposal to reform our health care system (BCRA) would make severe cuts to the Medicaid program, potentially leaving millions without health insurance coverage. Who gets Medicaid now? Many groups in our society who need the greatest protection, including seniors, individuals with very low income levels, people with disabilities, and children. Many states have very high numbers of children covered by Medicaid.  For example, in North Carolina, nearly 96% of children have health insurance.  A little under half of those children have Medicaid.

Stay tuned to our blog for the latest information about changes to our health care system and other cancer survivorship issues.

ACA “Skinny Bill” Repeal Failed

Last night the Senate voted against the so called ACA “Skinny-Bill” Repeal, 49-51.  This Skinny Bill Failsbill would have eliminated the medical device tax as well as the individual and employer mandates.

Practically speaking, this means that the protections and health insurance options created by the ACA remain, for now.

Thank you to all of you who contacted your elected officials and used your voice to advocate for the cancer community.

However, our work is not done.

Many Senators have expressed their concerns with how the ACA repeal efforts were handled in secret and without open committee hearings to discuss proposals to improve our healthcare system. We hope that can be seen as a signal for Congress to start working together to make changes where the ACA can be improved upon.

Unfortunately, after the vote the President has declared via Twitter: “let ObamaCare implode.”

Unfortunately, we just don’t know what that means.  It could mean that all federal agencies simply stop enforcing the consumer protections created in the law. It may also mean that the Department of Health and Human Services will stop paying for Americans to receive financial assistance to purchase health insurance.

Senate leadership has indicated that they plan to move on to other legislative priorities. So the possibilities now for health care reform include: bipartisan committee work (e.g., hearings, debate, new proposals, etc.), stabilizing the marketplaces, and administrative action by federal agencies to change the health care law.  However, these actions may end up being contrary to each other, as many threatened agency actions have actually helped to destabilize the marketplace and increase premiums.

One thing does seem certain, the efforts to provide accessible, affordable health care for all Americans must continue. If this is an issue that concerns you, you can keep talking to your elected officials about how important access to quality, affordable health insurance coverage is to the cancer community.

We will continue to provide updates on this issue and others impacting the cancer community.

Health Care Update: Senate This Week

Here is a quick update on what has happened in the Senate this week to make changes to our health care system.

  1. The Senate attempted to vote on an amendment that included the last version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), and $100 billion for Medicaid, which moderate Republicans wanted and a proposal from conservative Republican Senator Ted Cruz (TX), to allow bare-bones health insurance plans to be sold again. Result: Did not pass with a 43-57 vote
  1. The Senate then voted on an amendment to repeal the Affordable Care Act, without any replacement, but the repeal would not go into effect for two years. Result: Did not pass with a 45-55 vote

Next steps:

The Senate is now considering other amendments to see if they can get 50 Senators to agree on something, so that the Senate can send the bill back to the House to finalize legislation for the President to sign.

These amendments are being referred to as a “skinny repeal,” which means that they are looking at specific provisions in the ACA that they can repeal.  Provisions that they are discussion include removing all taxes created by the ACA, and eliminating the employer and individual mandates.

The Congressional Budget Office has said that the skinny repeal would cause premiums to increase by 20% and 16 million more people would be uninsured, almost immediately. Experts say that the skinny repeal would destabilize the individual insurance market.

There will continue to be votes throughout the week, so stay tuned and continue to contact your elected officials.

Senate This Week

Losing Your Health Insurance Coverage? Get the Details on Changes to Special Enrollment Periods.

You may qualify for a special enrollment period (SEP) to buy coverage through the Changes-to-Special-EnrollmentACA’s health insurance Marketplaces, if you experience a life-changing event that results in a loss of coverage, such as:

  • losing your employer based coverage,
  • aging out of your parent’s health insurance coverage, or
  • moving to a new state.

During a SEP you have 60 days to shop for, and buy, new health insurance coverage in the Marketplace. You may also add family members to your coverage during a SEP, if you get married, or give birth to or adopt a child.

Recently, the rules around special enrollment have changed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and there are a few extra steps that you now have to take.

On June 23, 2017, HealthCare.gov began requiring applicants to submit additional information to conduct a pre-enrollment verification of eligibility for a SEP. What this means, is that once you pick a plan the Marketplace will “pend” your enrollment and you will have 30 days to submit documents to confirm your SEP eligibility before you can begin using your coverage. When you submit an application on HealthCare.gov, you will get a notice with a list of documents you can send to provide this confirmation.

As soon as your SEP is verified, the Marketplace will send your information to the health insurance company you chose and your coverage will start based on when your SEP started and when you picked your plan. In some cases, this will be retroactive.

For more information and to see a copy of the various notices you may receive, visit the CMS Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight website.