Don’t Be Late! Medicare Part D Penalty

Within the alphabet soup that is Medicare, there are important deadlines of which to be Medicare Part D Penaltyaware.  If you are late to enroll you may be forced to pay a Medicare Part D penalty.

Medicare Part D is the prescription drug benefit of Medicare.  Like all of Medicare, there are specific and limited times that you can enroll in the program.  It is important to understand these enrollment periods, so you can avoid late enrollment penalties.

When can you enroll in Medicare Part D?

The Initial Enrollment Periods for Medicare include:

  • You’re newly eligible for Medicare because you turn 65. You get a 7-month period to pick your plans, which starts 3 months before the month you turn 65, includes the month you turn 65, and ends 3 months after the month you turn 65.
  • You’re newly eligible for Medicare because you’re disabled and under 65.
  • You’re already eligible for Medicare because of a disability, and you turn 65.
  • You HAVE Medicare Part A coverage, and you get Medicare Part B for the first time by enrolling during the Part B General Enrollment Period (January 1–March 31).

The Penalty

You may owe a late enrollment penalty if at any time after your Initial Enrollment Period is over, there’s a period of 63 or more days in a row when you don’t have Part D or other creditable prescription drug coverage. Creditable prescription drug coverage is coverage (for example, from an employer or union) that’s expected to pay, on average, at least as much as Medicare’s standard prescription drug coverage.

The late enrollment penalty is an amount that’s added to your Part D premium each month. If you have a penalty, you may have to pay it each month for as long as you have Medicare drug coverage!  The Part D late enrollment penalty is calculated as 1% of the national base beneficiary premium for each full, uncovered month that you didn’t have Part D or creditable coverage.

For example, if there was a period of 14 months that you did not have Part D or creditable prescription drug coverage, this is how the penalty is calculated:

14 months x 1% = .14

.14 x $35.63 (2017 base beneficiary premium) = $4.98

$4.98 rounded to the nearest $.10 = $5

$5.00 would be added to your monthly Part D premium for as long as you have Medicare Part D (which is usually for the rest of your life).  So each year you would be paying an additional $60 in Part D penalties. Over 20 years that would be $1,200 in completely avoidable penalties.

For more information about Medicare, read our Quick Guide to Medicare, or watch our webinar on “Making Sense of the Medicare Maze.”

For more information on the Part D Late Enrollment Penalty, visit www.medicare.gov/Pubs/pdf/11219-Understanding-Medicare-Part-C-D.pdf  or https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Outreach/Partnerships/downloads/11222-P.pdf

Understanding Medicare Part D – Prescription Drug Coverage

Medicare is a government health insurance program for eligible individuals. To be Medicare Part Deligible you must be: 65+ years old; have collected SSDI benefits for more than 24 months; or have been diagnosed with end stage renal disease (ESRD) or ALS. There are currently about 56 million Americans enrolled in Medicare.

Medicare coverage is broken up into “parts:”

  • Part A: Hospital Insurance – includes hospital care, skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, hospice, and home health services.
  • Part B: Medical Insurance – includes services from doctors, preventive care, outpatient care, lab tests, mental health care, ambulance services, and durable medical equipment.
  • Part D: Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) – different plans to choose from depending on where you live, with different premiums and formularies.
  • Part C: Advantage Plans. Part C is an alternative to Parts A & B and it includes the benefits and services covered under Parts A & B, and usually Part D. You can select a PPO or HMO plan that is run by a Medicare approved private insurance company.

For more information about Medicare, read our Quick Guide to Medicare, or watch our webinar on “Making Sense of the Medicare Maze.”

Medicare Part D is optional, but if you are taking prescription medication and do not have Part D, you may have to pay for medications out-of-pocket. If you decide later that you want Part D, but didn’t sign up when you were first eligible, you pay have to pay a late enrollment penalty.

How much you pay for Medicare Part D and out-of-pocket prescription drug costs depends on a number of factors, like which Part D plan you choose, how many prescriptions you take and how often, whether your pharmacy is in your plan’s network, whether your prescription drugs are on your Medicare Part D plan’s formulary, and more. To find which Medicare Part D plans are available where you live, click here.

Part D premiums generally range from $10-$100 per month (depending on the plans available in your area and on the specific plan you choose). The maximum deductible—the amount you must pay out-of-pocket before Medicare will contribute to your prescription costs—in 2017 is $400. After paying your deductible, then Medicare will pay 75% of your prescription drug costs and you will pay 25%, up to a total of $3,700.

What many refer to as the “donut hole” in Medicare Part D coverage is a gap in coverage when you have spent a certain total amount on covered prescriptions. In 2017, once you and your plan have spent $3,700 on covered drugs, you’re in the coverage gap. This amount may change each year. Also, people with Medicare who get Extra Help paying Part D costs won’t enter the coverage gap. For more information and examples of the coverage gap, visit Medicare.

Even with Part D coverage, prescription drugs can be expensive. Depending on your income level, you may qualify for financial assistance to help pay for your prescriptions drugs. A Low-Income Subsidy provides Medicare beneficiaries with assistance in paying their Part D monthly premium, annual deductible, coinsurance, and copayments. Some people may be eligible for Extra Help, a program aimed for those who do not automatically qualify for a Low-Income Subsidy. You may be entitled to Extra Help if you are entitled to Medicare and get full coverage from a state Medicaid program, you are enrolled in a Medicare Savings Program, or you get SSI disability benefits. The Medicare Savings Program pays for the Medicare Part A and the Medicare Part B premiums. It also pays Medicare cost-sharing expenses, including deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.

For more information on how to reduce your prescription drug costs, visit the following link. Examples include switching to lower-cost medication if approved by your health care team, or switching to mail-order programs from your plan.

You can also visit CancerFinances.org to find other financial assistance resources.

For help with Medicare and making plan choices, you can visit Medicare.gov or call 1-800-MEDICARE. You can also speak to a local counselor through the State Health Insurance Assistance Program. Click here, then pick your state from the drop down menu on the right, under “Find someone to talk to,” and it will provide the local contact information.

Losing Your Health Insurance Coverage? Get the Details on Changes to Special Enrollment Periods.

You may qualify for a special enrollment period (SEP) to buy coverage through the Changes-to-Special-EnrollmentACA’s health insurance Marketplaces, if you experience a life-changing event that results in a loss of coverage, such as:

  • losing your employer based coverage,
  • aging out of your parent’s health insurance coverage, or
  • moving to a new state.

During a SEP you have 60 days to shop for, and buy, new health insurance coverage in the Marketplace. You may also add family members to your coverage during a SEP, if you get married, or give birth to or adopt a child.

Recently, the rules around special enrollment have changed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and there are a few extra steps that you now have to take.

On June 23, 2017, HealthCare.gov began requiring applicants to submit additional information to conduct a pre-enrollment verification of eligibility for a SEP. What this means, is that once you pick a plan the Marketplace will “pend” your enrollment and you will have 30 days to submit documents to confirm your SEP eligibility before you can begin using your coverage. When you submit an application on HealthCare.gov, you will get a notice with a list of documents you can send to provide this confirmation.

As soon as your SEP is verified, the Marketplace will send your information to the health insurance company you chose and your coverage will start based on when your SEP started and when you picked your plan. In some cases, this will be retroactive.

For more information and to see a copy of the various notices you may receive, visit the CMS Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight website.

Uncertainty puts Marketplace Financial Assistance in Jeopardy

A recent study found that the average family in America spends 10.1% percent of the family’s income just on health insurance premiums and deductibles. So it’s no wonder Marketplace-Financial-Assistance-Jeopardythat many Americans need a little help purchasing health insurance coverage. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) made financial assistance available for people who buy health insurance in the marketplaces, based on their income level. However, due to uncertainty in politics, as well as policy and legislative changes, that financial assistance may be in jeopardy.

There are two different types of financial assistance in the marketplaces:

  • Premium tax credits reduce the amount that people pay for their monthly premiums to have health insurance.
  • Cost-sharing subsidies, also known as cost-sharing reductions, help to lower deductibles, co-payments and co-insurance. The way that cost-sharing subsides work is that the insurance company reduces what they charge individuals and, in turn, the insurance companies are reimbursed by the federal government.

Since the beginning of the year, uncertainty has put these financial assistance options in jeopardy. The new presidential administration had suggested that they were going to eliminate the cost-sharing reductions and that they would repeal the ACA, which would eliminate the premium tax credits, as well.

While health insurance companies are accustomed to dealing with uncertainty, like not knowing how many people will get sick during a given year, it is unusual for politics to create such uncertainly in the health insurance market.

Specifically, the uncertainty that will have the greatest impact is the fact that there has not be a clear decision from the President or Congress on if they are going to continue funding the cost-sharing reduction payments to insurance companies, and whether the individual mandate will be strictly enforced. The individual mandate was designed to insure that individuals do not wait to purchase insurance once they are sick. The IRS has already indicated that they will not strictly enforce the mandate moving forward.

Oliver Wyman, an actuarial consultant, states that these sort of ambiguities are new to actuaries who are in charge of setting the rates, and actuaries are predicting that 2018 insurance premiums are expected to increase between 28 and 40%.

Ultimately, the uncertainty around cost-sharing reduction payments, and the lack of enforcement of the individual mandate is projected to be responsible for the bulk of premium increases for 2018 and has already led some insurers to pull out of the marketplaces in some states, to avoid having to deal with the uncertainty.

This uncertainly, along with the current proposals for health care reform being discussed in the U.S. Senate, have the potentially to significantly impact the cancer community.

Stay tuned to our blog for the latest updates on proposed changes to our health care system.

Today Congress Voted to Take a Step Backwards

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives voted, by a two-vote margin, to pass the A Step BackwardsAmerican Health Care Act.  As we have talked about in prior posts, if signed, this law is a step backwards and would hurt millions of Americans.

It has the potential to effect people with pre-existing conditions like cancer, individuals who get their health insurance through an employer, people with disabilities or low incomes who receive care through Medicaid, and seniors receiving Medicare.

This bill was hastily thrown together and was passed without a score from the Congressional Budget Office, which means that Members of Congress don’t even know how much it is going to cost us.

For now, nothing has changed. The ACA Marketplaces are still open for business, Medicaid expansion still exists in the states that have expanded, and we still have the consumer rights afforded to us by the ACA.

Although this bill may appear to give people more choice when it comes to purchasing health insurance, it is important to remember that more choice doesn’t always mean better choice or more affordable choice. Lower cost plans that don’t provide adequate coverage for things like cancer treatment and mental health, will end up costing consumers more in the end.

It will likely be weeks before the Senate will consider the bill so now is the time to act. Contact your Senators, go to town halls being hosted by your elected officials, and educate yourself on how this law could really impact you.

Stay tuned to this blog as we will provide updates as more information becomes available.  Also, please join us on June 21, 2017 for a free webinar – An Update to Our Health Care System.  It is open to all and we are providing free CEUs for health care professionals.  Register today!

Latest Update on Changes to Our Health Care System – Our Worst Fears Realized

Our Worst Fears RealizedOnce again we find ourselves in the position of having to share some frightening news when it comes to health care system.  Last week, an amendment (referred to as the MacArthur Amendment) was proposed to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the legislation designed to ‘repeal and replace’ the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). In the last few days there have been additional negotiations to try to secure enough votes in the House of Representatives to pass this legislation.  According to new reports a vote is expected on this new version any day now. To state it plainly, the MacArthur Amendment is our worst fears realized.

The MacArthur Amendment makes a bad bill worse, and would:

  • Result in more than 24 million people losing their health insurance coverage;
  • Eliminate the Medicaid expansion program and cut more than $800 billion from Medicaid over the next decade;
  • Decrease the solvency of the Medicare Trust Fund by four years;
  • Eliminate the critical premium tax credits which lower the monthly premiums of plans being sold in the Marketplace for people;
  • Eliminate public health funding by repealing the Prevention and Public Health Fund established by the ACA;
  • And possibly most significantly, the new proposal would allow states to opt out of consumer protections, which would allow insurance companies to:
  • Not cover Essential Health Benefits – this means that insurance companies could decide to no longer cover chemotherapy, prescription drugs, prevention services, or hospitalization.
  • Increase costs for older adults – currently older adults can only be charged up to 3 times more for their coverage. This bill wants to increase that ratio to allow insurance companies to charge up to 5 times more for their coverage. Read this fact sheet for more information about how this bill would hurt older adults.
  • Charge people with pre-existing conditions higher premiums – while those states would then have to create a high risk pool, coverage in high risk pools could cost more, be delayed, or even have enrollment limits. High risk pools are not a new idea. In fact, more than 35 states had high risk pools to try to help people with pre-existing conditions access health insurance coverage, before the ACA became law. While those high risk pools offered a lifeline for many people to get access to coverage when they couldn’t get it another way, they were not a solution to the problem. For example, in California, the state’s high risk pool only offered coverage up to $75,000 a year. Cancer care is often much more expensive than that, which left people to pay for their care out-of-pocket. Many of those state high risk pools had 6-month waiting periods for coverage if you had a pre-existing condition, wait lists due to state budget constraints, and very high deductibles and out-of-pocket costs. Kaiser Health News has a video describing why high risk pools may sound like a good idea, but have some challenges in reality.

The Kaiser Family Foundation has an excellent side-by-side comparison of the ACA and the AHCA and the potential changes to our health care system.

It is important to note that the current bill specifically exempts these changes from impacting Members of Congress, so that their coverage is not reduced or their costs are not increased by this legislation.

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  • Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To reach your U.S. Representative, you can call the US Capitol Switchboard at (202)-224-3121, and an operator will help to connect you. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people who need coverage actually get it for 2017. If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces if you qualify for a special enrollment period.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar.

If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are or want to understand more about health insurance, visit CancerFinances.org.

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available.

ACA ‘Repeal and Replace’ Bill Unveiled

Repeal and Replace BilLate yesterday evening, a bill was introduced in Congress to repeal and replace the
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare).  Prior to the actual introduction of this piece of legislation, there was a lot of speculation about what would be included, and although a version was just released, the House of Representatives is expected to begin considering the legislation in the relevant committees this week.  This is very fast moving compared with other legislation.

The bill is significantly shorter than the ACA and has been named “The American Health Care Act.”

If passed, the law would make several significant changes to our health care system.  For example, the bill would:

  • Eliminate the current requirement that most Americans have health insurance or pay a penalty.
  • Eliminate the current requirement for large employers (50+ employees) to pay a penalty if they do not provide adequate and affordable health insurance to their employees.
  • Require that people have “continuous coverage” or else they could be charged a 30% higher premium. Starting with open enrollment for 2019 insurance plans, anyone who has gone more than 63 days without coverage during the previous 12 months will be assessed a 30% late-enrollment surcharge on top of their base premium.
  • Eliminate the current system of financial assistance to purchase individual health insurance that is based on income and household size. Instead the law would provide tax credits based on age, rather than income. Those under 30 would receive $2,000 per year, up to those over 60, who would receive $4,000 per year. Only individuals earning up to $75,000 a year and married couples filing jointly earning up to $150,000 a year for would be eligible for the full credit. It is estimated that many people currently receiving financial assistance would see a 50% cut in the assistance that they receive under this new law.
  • Change the funding structure of the Medicaid system (i.e., to a per capita payment). This means that each state will receive a set amount of money each year. If states run out of money during the year, they will either have to limit enrollment, limit coverage, or both. This system might end up looking like the failed High Risk Pool structure we had prior to the ACA.
  • Increases the amount that insurance companies can charge older Americans for their health insurance from a 3:1 ratio to 5:1 ratio. Currently, insurance companies cannot charge a 64 year old more than 3 times what it charges a 21 year old. This bill would change that to 5 times what a 21 year old is charged, making health care that much more expensive for older Americans.
  • Eliminate several of the taxes (e.g., the medical device tax, the tanning tax, a tax on high earners, etc.) created by the ACA that were designed to help pay for the financial assistance provisions and expansion of coverage.

The bill does not repeal the protections for people with pre-existing conditions and allowing young adults to stay on their parent’s policy until they turn 26, but also doesn’t address some of the gaps in coverage. For example, the bill does not address the cost of prescription drugs or how much insurance companies can increase rates year to year.

So, while some protections from the ACA will survive, it is anticipated that if this bill passes, many of the 20 million Americans that gained coverage under the ACA will be negatively impacted. For the cancer community, passage of this bill could mean an increased likelihood of facing financial ruin due to a diagnosis.

Of course very few bills are ever passed exactly as they are introduced, so there will still likely be more changes.  Additionally, even if this bill is passed by the House of Representatives, it still has to pass the Senate, and be signed by the President.

Stay tuned for more updates.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  1. Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.
  2. Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-storyor at org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Changes to our Health Care System under President Trump

changes to our health care system under President TrumpTriage Cancer believes that access to affordable, quality health insurance coverage and medical care is critical to improving the health and well-being of the cancer community.  To that end, we will continue to provide you with updates on what is happening in Washington, D.C. and in states across the country, with respect to any changes to our health care system under President Trump, and how those changes may impact the cancer community.

Webinar on Wednesday

On Wednesday, January 25, Triage Cancer is partnering with the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship on a webinar to bring you the latest news: Affordable Care Act Update: What Advocates and Cancer Survivors Need to Know.

What Happened in the Last Week

On Friday, President Trump took office and that afternoon, signed an executive order regarding The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  This executive order does not repeal the ACA, but it does allow agencies to waive or defer provisions that “impose a fiscal burden on any State or a cost, fee, tax, penalty, or regulatory burden on individuals, families, healthcare providers, health insurers, patients, recipients of healthcare services, purchasers of health insurance, or makers of medical devices, products, or medications.”

While there are few details in this executive order, it is broad enough to allow a number of potential significant changes. For example, under this order, the IRS could stop enforcing the requirement that people have health insurance coverage, referred to as the “individual mandate.”

Second, Republican Senators Susan Collins and Bill Cassidy introduced the Patient Freedom Act of 2017. The Senators claim that their bill will: return power to the states; increase access to quality, affordable health care for all Americans; improve patient choice; and begin to bring coverage to the nearly 30 million Americans who still do not have health insurance.  As we get additional details about this legislation we will share it with you.

Understanding the Possible “Replacements” & Other Changes

There is a great attention being paid to the repeal of the ACA, but there are other changes being discussed. Over the last few weeks, we have laid out how those changes may impact the cancer community in these blogs:

We also want to share some other resources that you may find helpful:

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.

Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-story at www.canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.

Post-Election Update: How health insurance may be changing

how health insurance may be changingAs we have reported since the election, changes to our health care system are likely to occur in 2017 and beyond.  While we wait for further action by Congress, we will continue to provide you with information about some of the the possible changes to our health care system and how we get health insurance.

Here are 4 ideas that we have heard from Republican leadership: President-elect Donald Trump, Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell:

  1. Provide Medicaid block grants to states
  2. Allow insurance companies to sell policies across state lines
  3. Provide tax credits for purchasing health insurance coverage
  4. Regulate drug prices

Let’s break down what these ideas may actually mean.

  1. Provide Medicaid block grants to states

Currently, Medicaid is funded through a matching system, with the federal government paying for part of the expense of providing Medicaid coverage and states picking up the rest of the cost. There currently isn’t a limit on the amount of funds a state can receive to meet the health care needs of its population.

A block grant is a fixed dollar amount to provide coverage for a state’s health care needs. When the money runs out, that’s it.  This greatly increases the chances that people would go without care.  For example, imagine a year where winter storms are particularly harsh and the flu season is extreme. This would increase the number of people in a particular state that need medical care. What would happen if the state has already spent its Medicaid funds by the end of November? Would no one receive medical care in December?

While the argument in favor of Medicaid block grants is to give states more flexibility to improve their Medicaid programs, in reality, a Medicaid block grant system would likely cause states to have to make tough decisions: a) reduce the number of people eligible for Medicaid; b) reduce the coverage available through Medicaid; or c) both.

Click here to learn more about why block grants only sound like a good idea.

There would also be an impact on hospitals and health care providers. In states that have expanded access to Medicaid, there are fewer uninsured people in those states.  When people are uninsured and need medical care, the burden is often placed on hospitals and health care providers to cover the cost of that “uncompensated care.” If uninsured individuals can’t pay their medical bills, then providers are the ones who suffer. Over the last few decades, many hospitals have had to close, because they can’t afford to cover that uncompensated care. The ACA reduced the amount of uncompensated care by increasing the number of people with health insurance coverage. A Medicaid block grant program would likely increase the number of people without health insurance coverage, increase uncompensated care, and place the burden back on health care providers.

And just to wade a little further into the weeds . . .

If individuals with more expensive pre-existing conditions don’t have access to Medicaid in their state, then they are more likely to enter the individual health insurance market.  Those individuals are most expensive to ensure, and insurers pass on those costs to everyone, which increases the cost of insurance for everyone. This has proven to be the case now. In states that expanded access to their Medicaid programs, the cost of premiums for individual plans in their state health insurance marketplace were, on average, 7% lower than in states that did not expand access to Medicaid.

  1. Allow insurance companies to sell policies across state lines

While there are some federal laws, like the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which provides consumers protections in health care, there are also state laws that provide protections. Those state laws can offer protections such as coverage mandates. For example, a state may require an insurance company to cover oral chemotherapy at the same rate as IV chemotherapy, to reduce the out-of-pocket expenses for patients. Some states even give their insurance commissioner the power to reject excessive monthly premiums charged by insurance companies.

The problem with selling health insurance policies across state lines, is that it provides a loophole that allows insurance companies to not comply with certain state law requirements and offer less comprehensive coverage. Watch this great video which explains why selling insurance across state lines may sound like a good idea, but really poses some practical challenges.

  1. Provide tax credits to help people purchase health insurance coverage

Speaker Ryan’s “A Better Way” proposal suggests offering an “advanceable, refundable tax credit for individuals and families.” Making the purchase of health insurance tax deductible would be very helpful for many people in the United States.  However, for those with lower income levels, it does not sufficiently help those individuals get the money to buy adequate health insurance coverage in the first place. In addition, given the possible repeal of the ACA, whether there will be individual health insurance policies to buy is still unclear.

  1. Regulating drug prices

The cost of prescription drugs has been skyrocketing for decades, partly due to the significant scientific advances that have been made. It was proposed during the election to lower the cost of drugs through regulation. Watch this video to learn more about why regulating drug prices sounds like a good idea, but may not work the way we hope. The devil really is in the details.

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  1. Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.

 

  1. Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-storyor at canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.

Post-Election Update: Are HSAs a health care solution?

As we anxiously await further action by Congress, we want to continue to share with HSA Health Care Solutionyou some of the possible changes to our health care system.  Today we are talking about if high deductible health plans and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) are a health care solution.

High Deductible Health Plans

A high deductible health plan is a health insurance plan that has a very high deductible. A deductible is a fixed dollar amount that you have to pay before your health insurance coverage begins. You could have a $0 deductible or a $10,000 deductible, depending on the plan that you choose.  This applies to plans that you might get through your employer or a plan that you would get from an insurance company. Now, when we say “high” deductible that is going to mean something different to each of us. But generally, in 2017, a high deductible health plan can have a deductible of $1,330 or more. But some plans have deductibles as high as $7,000. This means that you have to pay your $7,000 deductible out-of-pocket first, before your health insurance coverage kicks in.

The ACA did guarantee access to some preventive care and immunizations without having to pay a deductible, but if the ACA is repealed that protection might also go away.

Having to pay $7,000 or more before your health insurance coverage starts is something that most people would find difficult. And that is what contributed to the problem of medical bankruptcy. Prior to the ACA, 62% of all bankruptcies in the US were based on medical debt. And 78% of those individuals that had to file bankruptcy because of their medical bills actually had health insurance. Their higher out-of-pocket costs forced them into filing bankruptcy. Higher out-of-pocket costs also cause people to go without medical care.

On the other hand, the benefit to a high deductible health plan is that the monthly premium is usually lower. This might be a useful plan option if you are healthy and don’t need ongoing medical care. But, if you have a serious medical condition like cancer, you will likely pay more out-of-pocket with this type of coverage.

Health Savings Accounts or HSA’s

One way to deal with the costs of this type of coverage is by also choosing a Health Savings Account or HSA. A health savings account is a personal savings account where you can save money to pay for your medical expenses, including your deductible. There are significant tax benefits of having this account, because you don’t pay taxes on the money that you put in your HSA (up to a certain amount each year). The downside is that you actually have to have money to put in the HSA to use to pay your deductible and other medical expenses. And the concern is that most people don’t have the ability to save that kind of money to pay for their medical expenses.

Click here for a detailed overview of how high deductible health plans work with health savings accounts, and whether or not this is a realistic solution for individuals and families with lower incomes.

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  1. Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.
  1. Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-storyor at canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.