An Update From the States

An Update from the States

In an ongoing effort to keep you up to date on the many proposed and approved changes to our health care system and how they might impact the cancer community, this week, we bring you updates from around the country. If you don’t live in one of these states, be aware, these changes could come to your state next. 

Medicaid News:

Do you have Medicaid coverage? You can now access the services included in Amazon Prime for a discounted fee of $5.99 a month, less than half the regular cost of $12.99 a month. Access to Prime services, including free expedited shipping, can be particularly useful for someone who is treatment. Instead of having to go grocery shopping or running other errands for household items, Amazon Prime can deliver those items to your doorstep for free. Amazon also now offers electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards, which are used for food stamp benefits.

Other National News:

In the recent Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, passed by Congress on February 9th, there were several changes made to our health care system that may be helpful and challenging for the cancer community:

  1. It provided two additional years of funding to State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIP) and Area Agencies on Aging, which are two valuable resources that help seniors manage their Medicare coverage and get access to other programs and services.
  2. It eliminated the Medicare cap on access to outpatient physical, occupational, and speech therapy services as of January 1, 2018.
  3. It closed the Medicare Part D donut hole one year earlier in 2019, lowering the cost of prescription drugs for people with Medicare.
  4. It also changed the way that Medicare pays for home health services beginning in 2020. The home health coverage will be reduced from 60 days to 30 days and therapy thresholds will be eliminated. Beginning in 2019, Medicare will be allowed to base eligibility for home health services on a review of a patient’s medical record, including a home health agency’s record.

Hawaii:

The Hawaii House has approved a bill that would allow physicians to prescribe life-ending medication to terminally ill patients. The bill now moves to the Senate, which approved a similar bill laws year. If approved, Hawaii would join California, Colorado, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and the District of Columbia, which have death with dignity laws. Click here for more information about state laws.

Idaho:

A few weeks ago we shared that the Idaho Governor announced that he will allow insurance companies to sell plans in violation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA required health insurance plans to meet certain minimum requirements in order to protect consumers from pre-existing condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits, while ensuring coverage of essential health benefits.

This past week, the Trump Administration did reject Idaho’s plan to sell plans in violation of the ACA.  Many other states had been closely watching this decision, as they also were looking at allowing plans without the ACA consumer protections. The cancer advocacy community was pleased to see that these consumer protections wouldn’t be ignored. However, the Administration did suggest to Idaho that they instead promote the sale of short-term insurance plans. Click here for more information on these plans.

Iowa:

The Iowa Senate voted last week to let the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation and Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield sell health insurance plans that don’t comply with the ACA, allowing people with pre-existing conditions to be denied or charged more for coverage.  Given the Administration’s rejection of Idaho’s plans, it is likely that Iowa will not be able to move forward with the sale of these plans.

Arkansas:

There was a question as to whether or not Arkansas’ legislature was going to keep their expanded Medicaid program. However, lawmakers did vote to keep the program that covers 285,000 people in Arkansas another year.

In addition, the Trump Administration has approved Arkansas’ request to add a work requirement to their Medicaid program, joining Indiana and Kentucky as states that have added this new requirement. There are seven other states that have submitted applications for a Medicaid work requirement and 14 other states that are considering it.

Stay tuned for the latest news  . . .