Congress Takes Steps to Undermine the ADA

Many have heard of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but may not know all of the details. The ADA is the federal law that protects people with disabilities from discrimination in a variety of ways.

The ADA was passed by Congress in 1990, more than 28 years ago.  Congress improved protections in the ADA in 2008 by passing the ADA Amendments Act.  Most people are familiar with its physical access requirements, such as having accessible parking spots, ramps into buildings, and accessible restrooms. However, despite its age, many who are protected by the ADA, don’t know it.

In addition to physical access requirements, the ADA also provides protections for people with disabilities in the workplace.  Title I of the ADA requires that covered employers provide eligible employees with protection against discrimination and rights to privacy, as well as access to reasonable accommodations. For more information about these protections and how they apply to individuals diagnosed with cancer AND their caregivers, visit:

The ADA also provides protections for children, adolescents, and young adults with disabilities in school, including those diagnosed with cancer.

Approximately 36% of adults ages 65 and over have some type of disability. Learn 7 facts about Americans with disabilities.

This month, Congress took a step to erode the protections in the ADA.  The U.S. House of Representatives passed (252-192) the ADA Education and Reform Act, which forbids individuals with disabilities from suing a business for violating their rights under the ADA, unless they first:

  1. Provide written notice to the business that they are in violation of the ADA
  2. Wait 6 months to see if the business fixed the violation

Opponents of the bill argue that this allows businesses to refuse to comply with the ADA, until an individual with a disability sends them a written complaint and then they get another 6 months to comply. Meanwhile, the individual with a disability is unable to access that hospital, doctor’s office, restaurant, store, movie theater, hotel, or other public place.

Advocates for people with disabilities are skeptical that businesses need more time to comply with a law that was enacted almost thirty years ago.

In what other area of society do we allow a business to ignore a law until someone sends them a written complaint?

Oh, wait.  That sounds a lot like health insurance appeals.

The bill now awaits a vote in the U.S. Senate. For more information about how to be an effective advocate, visit Stay tuned.