Cancer in the News

What does the Affordable Care Act (ACA), race/ethnicity, and the 2008 economic recession have in common? They have all had an impact on the cancer community.

ACA Saves California Families $2,500 on Health Care

Ever since the ACA’s premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies took effect in 2014, Triage Cancer Blog Cancer in the Newsthe health care reform law has received severe criticism in the news media. Yet a recent study from the California Health Care Foundation shines a different, more positive light on the impact of the health care law. New data shows that median annual out-of-pocket spending for families with individual health insurance coverage has dropped nearly $2,500. This drop in spending is attributed to increases in consumer protections and coverage in the policies sold through the state health insurance marketplaces under the ACA. Although this study was specific to California, national health care spending has declined as well. For more information about the Affordable Care Act and how it impacts the cancer community, read our Quick Guide on Health Insurance.

The Deadly 2008 Recession

The 2008 economic collapse was a dark time for the world, as it caused many companies to lay off workers, who in turn were left unemployed and in debt. A new study has found that the 2008 recession also caused an additional 260,000 cancer deaths worldwide. The increased deaths are largely attributed to the US and Russia, both countries in which employers or individuals have to pay for their healthcare. On the other hand, countries with universal health coverage, like Britain, saw no additional cancer deaths between 2008 and 2010. This is because people in Britain, employed or not, had health insurance whereas many unemployed Americans and Russians either faced poor or delayed treatment, were diagnosed late, or couldn’t afford medical attention altogether. But it’s important to note that although the UK and other countries with universal health coverage did not experience an increase in deaths, they still underwent a significant rise in unemployment. This forced many countries into cutting their spending on health care. Ultimately, the impact a financial downturn has on the economy trickles down to cancer patients, for a reduction in government spending can impact access to care and impact cancer survivorship.

Intersectionality in the Cancer Community: Hispanic and Black Young Adults More Likely to Die of Their Disease Than White Counterparts

According to a study conducted by the University of Colorado Cancer Center, black and Hispanic cancer patients, between the ages of 15 and 29, have an increasingly higher risk of mortality than same-aged white cancer patients. This disparity is largely explained by one’s socioeconomic status and access to financial resources. However, even after holding insurance status constant, the scientists found the same discrepancies among the race/ethnic groups. The study therefore suggests that race/ethnicity is not only independent of socioeconomic status, but also that race/ethnicity plays an independent role in mortality. Additionally, this demonstrates that intersectionality among patients is in fact a lived reality in the cancer community. Meryl Colton, a medical student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, says that “Knowing that a disparity exists allows us to ask questions that can help ensure everyone receives the best possible care.” Now the focus can turn to identifying those questions and finding the right answers to them.

Triage Cancer
info@triagecancer.org