Getting Back to Work: SSDI Employment Supports

triage-cancer-blog-return-to-workReturning to work after being out because of a serious medical condition can be a scary prospect.  It usually takes a person quite a long time to get approved for SSDI benefits, so the thought of giving up those benefits is alarming if you are not 100% sure you’re ready to work.  The Social Security Administration understands that fear, and has you covered, with what they call “employment supports.”

This is a quick overview of SSDI employment supports and how they work together:

Step 1. The Trial Work Period (TWP)

This is an opportunity for you to test your ability to work, during which time you will continue to receive SSDI payments, no matter how much you earn as long as you still have a disability and are reporting your work to the SSA.  The details:

  • The TWP lasts for 9 months
  • The 9 months do not have to be in a row
  • The 9 months must take place within a 60 month timeframe

Step 2. The Extended Period of Eligibility (EPE)

This period begins the month after your TWP ends.  So, if you’ve worked and received benefits for 9 months, on your 10th month you would be in your EPE.  This means you might be eligible for another 36 months of benefits depending on how much you are earning. This one is a little trickier:

  • During your EPE, you will receive benefits for any month you work and your earnings are not considered a substantial gainful activity (SGA).
  • During your EPE there is a grace period. Meaning, if you suddenly get a raise or get more hours at work and your earnings are considered substantial, you will receive benefits for that month and the following 2 months.
  • Your benefits will end if your earnings are substantial in any month after the EPE ends.

Step 3. Expedited Reinstatement (EXR)

Step 3 only comes into play if you have returned to work and your SSDI benefits have ended because your earnings are considered substantial.  EXR is a safety net, meaning it’s there for you when everything is going great, you’re back to work, and then all of a sudden your medical condition flairs up.  The details:

  • If your benefits ended within the last 5 years due to an increase in your earnings, but you still have your original medical condition, you do not have to reapply for benefits.
  • Instead, you will receive 6 months of temporary benefits while your case goes under medical review. Also, if you are found not to be eligible for benefits after that review, you don’t have to pay back the temporary benefits you received.

Please visit www.ssa.gov/redbook/documents/TheRedBook2016.pdf to get a full understanding of the rules surrounding going back to work.

Climbing the Winding Staircase: Navigating Complementary Approaches to Cancer Care

by Oncology Social Worker Rita Abdallah, LISW-S, LCSW-C, ACSW

Complementary Approaches to CancerWhen patients enter the cancer center doors for the first time, they see a tall, spiraling staircase. The mystery unfolds as they unwillingly take their first step onto the staircase. With the help of a medical team and loved ones, patients slowly take on this long and challenging climb. Some days, the way up looks clear and easy; other days the staircase seems dusty and difficult.

Swimming has been a lifelong passion for Cathy, a middle-aged woman with breast cancer. Cathy’s treatment plan included surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. At her initial oncology visit, Cathy and her doctor openly discussed when she could return to the pool. At first, Cathy adjusted her swimming routine to shorter distances. She updated the oncologist on her progress and/or setbacks. Cathy listened carefully to her oncologist for guidance. In time, she went back to swimming at her own pace. Cathy was so happy to reconnect with her body and find her old self again.

Patients soon realize that cancer is a series of steps involving physical, emotional, mental and spiritual effort. Regardless of how fast or how hard the stairs are climbed, patients desire options that minimize suffering and maximize quality of life. Outside of conventional medicine, they may discover less invasive ways of caring for themselves. Complementary Alternative Medicine, or CAM, offers cancer patients chances to feel better and reclaim some of their health choices. When it comes to using CAM and complementary approaches to cancer care, patients need to talk to their healthcare providers, ask questions and carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of each therapy.

What is CAM?

According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, CAM is defined as:

  • If a non-mainstream practice is used together with conventional medicine, it’s considered “complementary.”
  • If a non-mainstream practice is used in place of conventional medicine, it’s considered “alternative.”

Other useful terms are “Integrative Medicine” which coordinates conventional and complementary approaches within care settings. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health officially uses “Complementary Health Approaches” to cover categories ranging from natural products to mind and body practices.

Talking to your healthcare team about CAM

When it comes to talking to healthcare providers about complementary health approaches, patients are hesitant to take that first step. AARP and The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine asked 1,559 people age 50 and older about their use of CAM and why they don’t talk about it at the clinic. Respondents reported that doctors don’t ask about their CAM approaches and patients don’t know they should disclose this information. Some patients believe doctors don’t have time to talk, lack knowledge about CAM and/or discourage patients from using it.

In the cancer setting, it is crucial for patients and the healthcare team to talk about complementary approaches. When chemotherapy, immunotherapy, surgery, transplants and radiation may be a part of the treatment plan, the healthcare team appreciates a full picture of all healthcare choices made by patients. Open and ongoing communication is essential for reducing and avoiding contraindications, undue harm or unknown reactions.  An excellent resource, full of tips, worksheets and resources is a downloadable workbook published by the National Cancer Institute called “Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine.” It also includes a great list of questions for patients to take with them to their medical appointment. If patients don’t have the energy or want help with this conversation, they should bring a trusted family member or friend for support.

Risks and benefits of CAM

Doctors and patients share similar challenges with it comes to determine which complementary approaches are proven, safe and effective. Some therapies are not regulated while others are not standardized. The body of knowledge is fast growing but limited depending on use of complementary therapies for specific cancer stages and disease types. Studies may involve animal subjects but not human testing because of unfamiliar side effects. The American Cancer Society has more detailed information on this subject.

Climbing CAM stairs

Once patients get closer to selecting a doctor-approved complementary therapy, they begin the search of a professional to get help. Use these tips to ensure the experience is a positive and favorable one.

  • Check out the latest research on a specific CAM approach
  • Ask your health insurance provider if coverage available
  • Get referrals from friends/family/healthcare provider
  • Find out the practitioner’s education, training, licensing and certifications
  • Call local cancer organization
  • Carefully search online and check sources
  • Try your chosen CAM approach a few times. If it isn’t working out, try something else or take a break. Don’t buy pricy packages or invest lots of time until this option meets your wellness objectives.

To learn more about CAM and Cancer, register for our free live webinar on February 22, 2017. Oncology Social Worker Rita Abdallah will present Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Cancer: Show Me the Proof! Register today! 

Infections – The Ugly Side Effect of Chemotherapy

triage-cancer-blog-infectionsWe are all familiar with the common cold, flu and ear aches.  These are all infections – either caused by bacteria or viruses.  Sometimes these infections need to be treated with prescription medicines, but often times our body just gets over an infection.  This is because our miraculous bodies have a built in protection called white blood cells.  When we develop an infection, our immune system produces more white blood cells to fight the infection.  This is the process in a typical, healthy person.

Unfortunately if you have cancer, you are not a typical, healthy person.  On top of the cancer itself, the treatment of cancer can make you sick.  Chemotherapy, while it may be saving your life, can also be putting you at risk of contracting an infection.  Chemo is a powerful drug that goes into your body and kills the fastest growing cells in your body – the good and the bad cells.  So the chemo kills your cancer cells, but it also kills your white blood cells.  Remember, white blood cells are the things you need to fight infections.  Generally, you will experience the lowest white blood cell count 7-12 days after your last chemo dose, and it could last for up to a week.  This period of time is called your “nadir,” meaning lowest point.  At this point you are at the greatest risk of getting an infection.  During this time you need to be extra diligent in protecting yourself against, and watching for signs of, an infection. Infections during chemo can be life threatening and may delay your ability to receive your next life-saving chemo treatment.

What are the signs of an infection?

Fever is the number one and most serious sign of an infection.  Take your temperature anytime you feel warm, flush, chilled or generally unwell.  At your nadir you may not be able to fight this infection on your own, so you need to call your doctor if you temperature is 100.4ºF or higher for more than 1 hour, or a one-time temperature of 101ºF or higher.  Seriously, night or day, call your doctor.  Make sure you:

  • Keep a working thermometer near you, and know how to use it.
  • Keep your doctor’s phone number with you at all times. Make sure you know if there is a different number to call when the office is closed.  Do not hold out through the night, waiting for your doctor’s office to open.
  • If you end up going to the emergency room, tell them right away that you are undergoing chemotherapy. You cannot wait around in a germ infested waiting room while your infection is left untreated.

Other signs of infection include:

  • Chills and sweats, with no fever
  • Change in a cough, or a new cough
  • Sore throat, or mouth sore
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nasal congestion
  • Stiff neck
  • Pain when you urinate
  • Unusual vaginal discharge or irritation
  • Increased urination
  • Diarrhea and/or vomiting
  • Redness, soreness or swelling near surgical wounds or ports
  • Pain in the abdomen or rectum

If you experience any of these signs or symptoms you should call your doctor immediately.

Can you reduce your risk of infection?

Every school age child knows that you can avoid a cold or flu by washing your hands.  As a cancer patient receiving chemo, you need to be absolutely obsessive about this.  Good old soap and water are the best choice, but hand sanitizers are a good second choice. You should wash your hands:

  • Before, during, and after cooking food
  • Before you eat
  • After you go to the bathroom
  • After you change a diaper
  • After you touch your pet, or clean up after your pet
  • After touching the trash
  • Before treating any wound

Beyond washing your hands, you should also maintain good oral and body hygiene, use disinfectants to keep your household clean, avoid coming into contact with sick people, and try to avoid getting scraped or cut.  You should also avoid undercooked or raw meat and eggs, avoid unpasteurized or raw products, and wash your fruits and vegetables really well.

Undergoing chemotherapy is uncomfortable enough without getting an infection.  Be overly observant and very, very clean and you can minimize your chances of getting infections.

Working for Yourself, Retiring with Uncle Sam: Social Security for the Self-Employed

triage-cancer-blog-self-employedAnyone who has ever worked for someone else has likely seen the Social Security deduction on their paystub (there are some employees who pay into a private retirement system). This is the tax that is automatically deducted from your pay check each pay period for Social Security retirement benefits. This money (6.2% from your employer and 6.2% from you) goes directly into the Social Security pot. We contribute now and then in retirement we receive a Social Security retirement benefit.  It’s a pretty seamless process.

But what if you’re self-employed?  If you operate a trade, business, or profession either by yourself or with a partner, you may be considered self-employed. Working for yourself can feel quite liberating, but it can be very confusing when it comes to paperwork.  Now that you’re writing the paychecks, you need to report your earnings and pay taxes to the IRS and Social Security Administration.  But how?

The simple answer is that you report your earnings for Social Security when you file your federal income tax return. If your net earnings are $400 or more in a year, you have to report your earnings on Schedule SE, in addition to the other tax forms you have to file.  And now that you’re working for yourself, you have to pay the entire 12.4% tax on up to $118,500 of your net earnings.

Don’t despair!  As a self-employed person, paying into Social Security allows you two income tax deductions.

  1. You can reduce your net earnings from self-employment by half the amount of your total Social Security tax. This means that you can take 6.2% off your net earnings (net earnings are you’re your gross earnings, minus any allowable deductions and depreciation). So if you report net earnings of $100,000, you can take $6,200 off that before you figure your Social Security tax.  This is similar to the way employees are treated under the tax laws, because the employer’s share of the Social Security tax is not considered wages to the employee.
  2. You can also deduct half of your Social Security tax on IRS Form 1040. But the deduction must be taken from your gross income in determining your adjusted gross income.

One of the benefits to paying into the Social Security retirement system in addition to having retirement benefits, is that if you are no longer able to work because of a medical condition, you may qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance.

This is an introduction to a complex topic, so we encourage you to talk to a tax or accounting professional.  You can also visit the Social Security Administration site, where they have a guide on this topic.

Congratulations on being your own boss and best of luck to you!

Are You An Unknowing Beneficiary of a Life Insurance Policy?

Shockingly, there is nearly $1 billion in unclaimed life insurance benefits out there, pexels-photo-187107according to Consumer Reports.  That means that millions of people who were supposed to receive a life insurance benefit didn’t know they were supposed to receive it and did not pursue a claim.  Thankfully, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) are doing something about it.

NAIC recently launched a new online tool called the Life Insurance Policy Locator.  This tool will help consumers search for possible life insurance policy or annuity proceeds anywhere in the nation.  One of the problems consumers had in the past is that they may have suspected they or a family member was the beneficiary of a life insurance policy or annuity, but didn’t have key information like the policy number or the name of the insurance company. With the Life Insurance Policy Locator you can simply start with the person’s name.  Obviously, the more information you can provide is better, but not necessary to submit a request.

This is how it works:

  • Submit a request
    • NAIC will then ask participating companies to search their records to determine whether they have a life insurance policy or annuity contract in the name of the deceased.
    • If you are a beneficiary or authorized to receive information, companies that have policy information for you will respond directly to you.
    • It may take up to 90 business days to be contacted. The insurance company may require additional information from you like a notarized death certificate and documentation of your legal authority to request or obtain information about the deceased.
    • This service is completely free.

If you think that you might be a life insurance beneficiary, it doesn’t hurt to submit a request and see if part of that $1 billion could be yours.

Being Aware of Our Environment: Asbestos and Mesothelioma

Most of us are aware of the toxins in our environment that could be detrimental to our health, like pollution, mold, and secondhand smoke. But many people don’t really think mesotheliomaabout another danger that could be hidden in their walls, the shingles on the roof, or the brake pads of their car: asbestos. Asbestos is a natural fiber that has been mined for decades because of its fire resistant properties. When disturbed, we can inhale these fibers and then they stick to the linings of our organs. Because they’re so durable, our bodies can’t break them down and get rid of the foreign toxin. Instead, anywhere from 10-50 years later, the symptoms of Mesothelioma might start to show.

Mesothelioma, a rare cancer, is known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. The cancer can develop in the lining of the abdomen, chest, or lungs. Pleural mesothelioma, or the type that develops in the lungs, is the most common resulting in 80% of cases. Regardless of the type, patients typically see nonspecific symptoms at first. The earlier symptoms of mesothelioma can include shortness of breath, chest pain, or lack of appetite. This leads to many believing they have the flu or another common, less serious ailment. Being aware of potential asbestos exposure is essential for an early diagnosis. It’s important to also remember secondhand exposure as a serious risk, if any loved ones have worked with asbestos. Though there are only 3,000 cases diagnosed each year, it’s estimated that 20 million people are at risk of developing this cancer and another 125 million people worldwide are exposed to asbestos in their workplaces each year.

Since this disease is so difficult to diagnose, it can sometimes take months for an official diagnosis to be made. In most cases, the disease has already progressed to a later, harder to treat stage. As such, the prognosis for mesothelioma patients is generally very poor. . Recently, there have been great strides made in developing better mesothelioma treatment methods and diagnostic techniques. Immunotherapy, for example, has shown promise for mesothelioma patients in a variety of clinical trials. Initiatives like the Cancer Moonshot 2020, a collaboration like no other to cure cancer, and Microsoft’s Project Hanover, which seeks to use artificial intelligence to solve cancer, also bring hope to patients for the future.

Though a cure for mesothelioma  is still likely a ways off, there are steps we can take to help eliminate and prevent further mesothelioma cases. Asbestos is still not banned in the United States, even though 52 other countries have banned the toxin because of its health risks. Recent progress, however, gives hope for a future ban. Over the summer, the Frank R. Lautenberg Act was passed to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act, which allowed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate existing chemicals for environmental and public health risks. On November 29th, their list of the first ten chemicals they will investigate included asbestos. Though this news doesn’t promise a ban on asbestos anytime soon, it’s a huge step in the right direction.

In the meantime, the best prevention is to continue raising awareness on the dangers of asbestos and educating loved ones. Together our voices can help make a difference in banning asbestos and saving millions of lives!

Cancer & Employment: International Series – Canada

After years of advocating for a national disabilities act in Canada, the calls from triage-cancer-blog-canada-employmentdisability-rights activists and persons with disabilities have been answered.

Carla Qualtrough, minister of sport and persons with disabilities, initiated a pending national act for people with disabilities that will be enacted sometime within a year and a half. The law will establish a standard for federally regulated employers and service providers, such as banks, telecommunications, trains, and airlines, in order to ensure accessibility and fairness in the workplace for Canadians with a disability.

According to an interview with the Free Press, Qualtrough has placed this law as her “No. 1 deliverable to the prime minister.” This push for the national law was deeply rooted in the displeased voices of people with disabilities, for half of all the complaints received by the Canadian Human Rights Association were filed by people with disabilities.

Although Canada has the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a principle that provides some protection for people with disabilities, one has to challenge a violation (if one arises) with the Canadian Human Rights Association. This creates an additional barrier that can discourage a person with disability from challenging a potentially harmful situation. “A national disabilities act could make the process more proactive,” Qualtrough said.

Additionally, some provinces in Canada provide some protections, but this national act would extend protections to all Canadians.

The new legislation will is expected to be introduced in the fall of 2017 or spring 2018. In the meantime, the more than 4 million Canadians with disabilities can look forward to a more equitable society.

For more information about employment rights in Canada, visit: http://www.monster.ca/career-advice/article/employment-law-knowing-your-employee-rights.

Changes to our Health Care System under President Trump

changes to our health care system under President TrumpTriage Cancer believes that access to affordable, quality health insurance coverage and medical care is critical to improving the health and well-being of the cancer community.  To that end, we will continue to provide you with updates on what is happening in Washington, D.C. and in states across the country, with respect to any changes to our health care system under President Trump, and how those changes may impact the cancer community.

Webinar on Wednesday

On Wednesday, January 25, Triage Cancer is partnering with the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship on a webinar to bring you the latest news: Affordable Care Act Update: What Advocates and Cancer Survivors Need to Know.

What Happened in the Last Week

On Friday, President Trump took office and that afternoon, signed an executive order regarding The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  This executive order does not repeal the ACA, but it does allow agencies to waive or defer provisions that “impose a fiscal burden on any State or a cost, fee, tax, penalty, or regulatory burden on individuals, families, healthcare providers, health insurers, patients, recipients of healthcare services, purchasers of health insurance, or makers of medical devices, products, or medications.”

While there are few details in this executive order, it is broad enough to allow a number of potential significant changes. For example, under this order, the IRS could stop enforcing the requirement that people have health insurance coverage, referred to as the “individual mandate.”

Second, Republican Senators Susan Collins and Bill Cassidy introduced the Patient Freedom Act of 2017. The Senators claim that their bill will: return power to the states; increase access to quality, affordable health care for all Americans; improve patient choice; and begin to bring coverage to the nearly 30 million Americans who still do not have health insurance.  As we get additional details about this legislation we will share it with you.

Understanding the Possible “Replacements” & Other Changes

There is a great attention being paid to the repeal of the ACA, but there are other changes being discussed. Over the last few weeks, we have laid out how those changes may impact the cancer community in these blogs:

We also want to share some other resources that you may find helpful:

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.

Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-story at www.canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.

Post-Election Update: How health insurance may be changing

how health insurance may be changingAs we have reported since the election, changes to our health care system are likely to occur in 2017 and beyond.  While we wait for further action by Congress, we will continue to provide you with information about some of the the possible changes to our health care system and how we get health insurance.

Here are 4 ideas that we have heard from Republican leadership: President-elect Donald Trump, Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell:

  1. Provide Medicaid block grants to states
  2. Allow insurance companies to sell policies across state lines
  3. Provide tax credits for purchasing health insurance coverage
  4. Regulate drug prices

Let’s break down what these ideas may actually mean.

  1. Provide Medicaid block grants to states

Currently, Medicaid is funded through a matching system, with the federal government paying for part of the expense of providing Medicaid coverage and states picking up the rest of the cost. There currently isn’t a limit on the amount of funds a state can receive to meet the health care needs of its population.

A block grant is a fixed dollar amount to provide coverage for a state’s health care needs. When the money runs out, that’s it.  This greatly increases the chances that people would go without care.  For example, imagine a year where winter storms are particularly harsh and the flu season is extreme. This would increase the number of people in a particular state that need medical care. What would happen if the state has already spent its Medicaid funds by the end of November? Would no one receive medical care in December?

While the argument in favor of Medicaid block grants is to give states more flexibility to improve their Medicaid programs, in reality, a Medicaid block grant system would likely cause states to have to make tough decisions: a) reduce the number of people eligible for Medicaid; b) reduce the coverage available through Medicaid; or c) both.

Click here to learn more about why block grants only sound like a good idea.

There would also be an impact on hospitals and health care providers. In states that have expanded access to Medicaid, there are fewer uninsured people in those states.  When people are uninsured and need medical care, the burden is often placed on hospitals and health care providers to cover the cost of that “uncompensated care.” If uninsured individuals can’t pay their medical bills, then providers are the ones who suffer. Over the last few decades, many hospitals have had to close, because they can’t afford to cover that uncompensated care. The ACA reduced the amount of uncompensated care by increasing the number of people with health insurance coverage. A Medicaid block grant program would likely increase the number of people without health insurance coverage, increase uncompensated care, and place the burden back on health care providers.

And just to wade a little further into the weeds . . .

If individuals with more expensive pre-existing conditions don’t have access to Medicaid in their state, then they are more likely to enter the individual health insurance market.  Those individuals are most expensive to ensure, and insurers pass on those costs to everyone, which increases the cost of insurance for everyone. This has proven to be the case now. In states that expanded access to their Medicaid programs, the cost of premiums for individual plans in their state health insurance marketplace were, on average, 7% lower than in states that did not expand access to Medicaid.

  1. Allow insurance companies to sell policies across state lines

While there are some federal laws, like the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which provides consumers protections in health care, there are also state laws that provide protections. Those state laws can offer protections such as coverage mandates. For example, a state may require an insurance company to cover oral chemotherapy at the same rate as IV chemotherapy, to reduce the out-of-pocket expenses for patients. Some states even give their insurance commissioner the power to reject excessive monthly premiums charged by insurance companies.

The problem with selling health insurance policies across state lines, is that it provides a loophole that allows insurance companies to not comply with certain state law requirements and offer less comprehensive coverage. Watch this great video which explains why selling insurance across state lines may sound like a good idea, but really poses some practical challenges.

  1. Provide tax credits to help people purchase health insurance coverage

Speaker Ryan’s “A Better Way” proposal suggests offering an “advanceable, refundable tax credit for individuals and families.” Making the purchase of health insurance tax deductible would be very helpful for many people in the United States.  However, for those with lower income levels, it does not sufficiently help those individuals get the money to buy adequate health insurance coverage in the first place. In addition, given the possible repeal of the ACA, whether there will be individual health insurance policies to buy is still unclear.

  1. Regulating drug prices

The cost of prescription drugs has been skyrocketing for decades, partly due to the significant scientific advances that have been made. It was proposed during the election to lower the cost of drugs through regulation. Watch this video to learn more about why regulating drug prices sounds like a good idea, but may not work the way we hope. The devil really is in the details.

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  1. Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.

 

  1. Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-storyor at canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.

Post-Election Update: Are HSAs a health care solution?

As we anxiously await further action by Congress, we want to continue to share with HSA Health Care Solutionyou some of the possible changes to our health care system.  Today we are talking about if high deductible health plans and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) are a health care solution.

High Deductible Health Plans

A high deductible health plan is a health insurance plan that has a very high deductible. A deductible is a fixed dollar amount that you have to pay before your health insurance coverage begins. You could have a $0 deductible or a $10,000 deductible, depending on the plan that you choose.  This applies to plans that you might get through your employer or a plan that you would get from an insurance company. Now, when we say “high” deductible that is going to mean something different to each of us. But generally, in 2017, a high deductible health plan can have a deductible of $1,330 or more. But some plans have deductibles as high as $7,000. This means that you have to pay your $7,000 deductible out-of-pocket first, before your health insurance coverage kicks in.

The ACA did guarantee access to some preventive care and immunizations without having to pay a deductible, but if the ACA is repealed that protection might also go away.

Having to pay $7,000 or more before your health insurance coverage starts is something that most people would find difficult. And that is what contributed to the problem of medical bankruptcy. Prior to the ACA, 62% of all bankruptcies in the US were based on medical debt. And 78% of those individuals that had to file bankruptcy because of their medical bills actually had health insurance. Their higher out-of-pocket costs forced them into filing bankruptcy. Higher out-of-pocket costs also cause people to go without medical care.

On the other hand, the benefit to a high deductible health plan is that the monthly premium is usually lower. This might be a useful plan option if you are healthy and don’t need ongoing medical care. But, if you have a serious medical condition like cancer, you will likely pay more out-of-pocket with this type of coverage.

Health Savings Accounts or HSA’s

One way to deal with the costs of this type of coverage is by also choosing a Health Savings Account or HSA. A health savings account is a personal savings account where you can save money to pay for your medical expenses, including your deductible. There are significant tax benefits of having this account, because you don’t pay taxes on the money that you put in your HSA (up to a certain amount each year). The downside is that you actually have to have money to put in the HSA to use to pay your deductible and other medical expenses. And the concern is that most people don’t have the ability to save that kind of money to pay for their medical expenses.

Click here for a detailed overview of how high deductible health plans work with health savings accounts, and whether or not this is a realistic solution for individuals and families with lower incomes.

We hope that our elected officials will keep these issues in mind as they make their decisions over the next few days, weeks, and months on any changes to health care system.

What You Can Do

We will have to continue to wait and see what happens, but in the meantime, there is something that you can do.

  1. Share your experience and concerns: Call or email your elected officials and share your health insurance concerns. To find your elected officials or learn more about becoming an advocate, visit our Advocacy resources page. You can also find the Facebook and Twitter handles for the current members of Congress here.
  1. Tell your story: Share your story with Families USA or the National Coalition of Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), two health care advocacy organizations that are working to help our elected officials understand the dire consequences of repealing the ACA and how certain changes to our health care system can impact us all. But they need the stories of real people. If you feel comfortable doing so, you can share your story at http://familiesusa.org/share-your-storyor at canceradvocacy.org/blog/share-your-aca-story.

Do You Need Health Insurance Now?

We also want to remind you that change is Washington is rarely swift and that we may not see changes for most of 2017.  That means that we have to continue to operate with the system we have for now and ensure that people have health insurance coverage for 2017.  If you do not have health insurance coverage, you can apply for Medicaid at any time or purchase a policy through the State Health Insurance Marketplaces until January 31, 2017.

For more information about how to choose a health insurance policy (including making choices between employer-sponsored options), watch our recorded webinar. If you aren’t sure what your health insurance options are, you can get personalized information on our recently released resource: www.CancerFinances.org.

Stay Tuned

Stay tuned to our Blog and sign up for our newsletter, as we will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available in the coming days, weeks, and months.